US Threat to Internet freedom

More than two years after Secretary of State Hillary Clinton gave her first speech declaring "Internet freedom" to be a major component of U.S. foreign policy, it turns out that many of the most sophisticated tools used to suppress online free speech and dissent around the world are actually Made in the USA... the U.S. government is the biggest and most powerful customer of American-made surveillance technology..
Inconveniently, governments around the democratic world are pushing to expand their own censorship and surveillance powers as they struggle to address genuine problems related to cybercrime, cyberwar, child protection, and intellectual property. Even more inconveniently, the U.S. government is the biggest and most powerful customer of American-made surveillance technology, shaping the development of those technologies as well as the business practices and norms for public-private collaboration around them. As long as the U.S. government continues to support the development of a surveillance-technology industry that clearly lacks concern for the human rights and civil liberties implications of its business - even rewarding secretive and publicly unaccountable behavior by these companies - the world's dictators will remain well supplied by a robust global industry.
American-made technology has turned up around the Middle East and North Africa over the past year -- from Syria to Bahrain to Saudi Arabia, from pre-revolutionary Tunisia to Egypt -- in contexts that leave no doubt that the software and hardware in question were being used to censor dissenting speech and track activists. While much of this technology is considered "dual use" because it can be used to defend computer networks against cyberattack as well as to censor and monitor political speech, some members of Congress are seeking to prevent its use for political repression...

Popular posts from this blog

History Archive: Communist Party of India's resolution on Pakistan and National Unity, September 1942

The Almond Trees by Albert Camus (1940)

The Assassination of Mahatma Gandhi: Inquiry Commission Report (1969)

STATEMENT BY ASHOKA UNIVERSITY FACULTY - March 18, 2021

The Republic of Silence – Jean-Paul Sartre on The Aftermath of War and Occupation (September 1944)

Alexandre Koyré: The Political Function of the Modern Lie (1945) /John Keane: lying, journalism and democracy

Covid County Simulator (valid for the USA, but with lessons for the world at large)